Make the Most of Your Twenties

BOOK REVIEW: The Defining Decade, by Mag Jay, PhD.

First off, I’ll admit I don’t often read non-fiction. So you might – like me – also be thinking that this is an interesting choice for my first book review blog, but hear me out.

Today marks my first day in the office since embarking on this journey called self-employment, and it is scary.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.

Meg Jay, in her book The Defining Decade, talks about identity capital, this idea that all of our life experiences add up to make us the people we are. From our love and relationships, to the work we do day-to-day, to the way we care for and use our bodies, we are building up the core of who we are and what we can then contribute to the world.

So here I am, sitting in an office of twenty-something-year-old graduate entrepreneurs, hoping that I am building up the right kind of identity capital.

The Defining Decade perfectly captures the anxieties of a generation, while simultaneously bestowing a hope that we can’t get from headlines about Millennials being lazy, killing industries, or buying too many avocados. While much of the media seems to berate us, Jay illuminates those possible pathways that lead to fulfilment in an unfulfilling world.

I absolutely must give this book my highest recommendation – it is eye-opening in a way that is gentle and encouraging (rather than an overwhelming tide of information or a slap in the face). The real-life examples from Jay’s therapy clients are relatable and endearing, and will bring to mind all those conversations you’ve had on your friend’s sofa into the early hours, wishing you could find your thing.

In short, make Meg Jay and The Defining Decade your personal spirit guide to your twenties.